COVID-19 got me, then a catastrophic flood: valid excuses for not blogging?

By Bone & Silver with permission

Hi everyone, long time no see. Sorry I’ve been ‘missing in WordPress action’, it’s been a terrible 6 weeks here in Australia.

On a personal level, I finally caught Covid, despite being super cautious for 2 years! It was bound to happen: my darling son Nearly22 brought it unknowingly into the home, despite 3 negative RATs & a negative PCR… *sigh

I hoped I may be fine (we were only together for a few hours, but one of them was in the car), plus returned 2 negative RATs & a negative PCR, then on Day 6 since my exposure, I was hit by a sledgehammer of chills/aches/red eyes/nausea/fatigue/dizziness/brain fog.

It was horrible.

I was one of the last people I know to get it, so luckily I had regular soothing phone calls about what to expect, what to take, & what may happen next.

I literally spent 10 days in my pyjamas, dragging myself from bed to kitchen to couch to bed. Dosing myself every 1-2 hours, as well as eucalyptus steam baths, became almost a full time job.

By Day 12 since testing positive, I could feel a shift in my energy… and then I got a negative RAT again. Woohoo! Never have I felt so glad to know something foreign was out of my body.

Exhaustion lingered though. Brain fog would curl in from the edges of my mind, until all I could do was lie down immediately and rest. Other friends (whether vaxxed or not) had that experience too, which was somehow reassuring.

I spent a week at about 70% of my normal energy, then the flood catastrophe hit, in the early hours of Monday 28 Feb.

It had been raining for days- constant drizzles and downpours, making everything soggy and the creeks brown and swollen.

Then this ‘Rain Bomb’ arrived on the East Coast of Australia, and just sat there, unleashing.

Floods were predicted, but height levels kept increasing… until finally mass destruction brought landslides, roads washed away, houses waist deep or neck deep in water… scenes of devastation everywhere.

Have you ever been in a flood? Look around you now, where you sit reading this blog: imagine dirty smelly water rising up fast over every single thing you own, until you’re standing on a kitchen bench trying to break into your roof cavity so that you can get away from it.

Oh and in the dark too, at 3am, because the power’s gone.

There are so many vivid experiences like that where I live; I’m sure you’ve seen images on the news.

My dearest friends thought they were going to drown- they were rescued by the SES (emergency services) out of their 2nd storey front room window, and had to duck under the electricity lines as they were boated to safety.

That’s how high the water was.

It’s inconceivable.

And now is the massive clean up, by traumatised people, forced to stay in an evacuation centre, while others with safe dry houses up the hill have entire households (& pets) staying in any spare rooms.

It is catastrophic.

[Search for more images & video at Lismore 2022 flood]

I live 30 minutes away, and I am safe. But I have loved Lismore and her creative, quirky, queer, friendly population since I moved there in 1997; it breaks my heart to see the loss and devastation.

But this is the reality of climate change. It’s been predicted by science for years: “more severe weather events, more often.”

I’ve been volunteering at the Evacuation Centre, helping friends clean out houses (such sticky, smelly mud- made my Covid cough worse for sure), and completely forgetting my WordPress world.

Sorry.

I’m exhausted now, three weeks since the flood. And I’ve lost nothing, while so many have lost everything. Whole lives and homes thrown onto the street, becoming piles of rotting garbage.

It’s hard to feel positive in times like these.

Sorry again.

It has felt good to tell a little of my recent story though, and reach out.

In gratitude for community, G xO

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